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This week at the City Planning Commission

Arthur Huh, Planning and Development Specialist | August 5, 2013 in Planning,Rezonings,Zoning,Zoning Resolution | Comments (0)

 

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For those of you planning to attend this week’s CPC public hearing session, remember that the host venue is the National Museum of the American Indian, in the former U.S. Custom House building, at One Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan.  When the CPC expects an extraordinary turnout for a public hearing, it makes special arrangements to move the proceedings—normally at its headquarters at 22 Reade Street—to an offsite location, and this week’s agenda should validate the move.

(more…)

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Who’s Who in New York City Land Use: A Beginner’s Guide to City Agencies

Arthur Huh, Planning and Development Specialist | July 30, 2013 in Development,Planning,Zoning | Comments (1)

CNY

In the world of land use and real estate development here in New York City – even to those of us who work in (or are students of) it – it can sometimes feel like a foreign language is being spoken, with all the jargon, acronyms and bureaucratic titles involved.

Today’s entry provides a primer on some of the key players in local government who share some responsibility for writing, interpreting and applying the myriad rules and regulations one must navigate long before – and sometimes long after – the proverbial “first shovel” goes into the ground.  In a future post we’ll explain some of the frequently heard terms that describe the rules and issues that we as planners deal with on a daily basis.

After the jump, in alphabetical order (by acronym, as that’s how they we typically refer to them), are just some of the city agencies with a role in the land use process.  If you’re considering any kind of development within the five boroughs, you’ll be getting to know one or more of these entities along the way.  (And for further information on the responsibilities of each, click on the name to visit the official Web site.)

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New York Times Questions Rationale Behind East Midtown Rezoning

Mitch Korbey, Partner, Herrick's Land Use Group | July 25, 2013 in Planning,Rezonings,Zoning,Zoning Resolution | Comments (0)

East Midtown

Today, the New York Times weighed in with its commentary on the City’s East Midtown Rezoning – and we think they miss the mark.

The piece (which is misplaced in the Arts Section) argues that the plan, developed by the Department of City Planning, calls for too much density, without sufficient focus on infrastructure and mass transit – and it seems to suggest that people won’t be working in high-rises so much (but is silent about living).

Density is good for the environment, and it is good for New York.  It is a key reason why the City’s “carbon footprint” is so low.  Density is also good for the workplace – as it brings people and corporations together.  It is good for neighborhoods and for the life of the City.  The rezoning’s focus on Grand Central (contrary to the main theme of the Times’ commentary) demonstrates an awareness of the basic need to support the highest densities at and around established transit nodes.  The plan is not an irresponsible call for enormous buildings – but an incentive program to encourage the replacement and rebuilding of undersized and obsolete Class “B” buildings.

The plan doesn’t pretend that zoning is a panacea – it’s but one tool in an overall effort to keep New York City globally competitive while also balancing a regional focus among Hudson Yards, Lower Manhattan and Midtown.

The Times piece would be better placed in the Metropolitan section – and would better serve the readers if it were more comprehensive.

(Image borrowed from Department of City Planning presentation of East Midtown Rezoning).

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Too much manufacturing or too little?

Mitch Korbey, Partner, Herrick's Land Use Group | July 23, 2013 in Herrick ZONE,Planning,Trends,Zoning | Comments (1)

Notwithstanding the plethora of rezonings accomplished by the City Planning Commission (with the approval of the City Council) over the past decade—many of which erased industrial zoning—New York City continues to maintain multiple manufacturing districts throughout the five boroughs.  Yet, except for certain niche industries and highly specialized manufacturing businesses, the decline of traditional industrial uses continues.  Of course, key concentrations of industrial jobs do exist, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and portions of Industry City (also in Brooklyn), for example.  But it seems quite clear that these are not in the “traditional smokestack” industries, where assembly lines of people engage in round-the-clock mass production.  On the contrary, a range of manufacturing sectors has actually lost hundreds of jobs over the last few decades, of which garment businesses are among the most recognizable.

(more…)

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Westchester Fair Housing Update

Richard Bass, Urban Planner, Herrick's Land Use Group | April 17, 2013 in Affordable Housing,Westchester | Comments (0)

Westchester County continues to avoid compliance with the County’s settlement agreement to produce 750 units of affordable housing in communities with low minority population.  Please see Monday’s New York Times editorial, Westchester Loses Again on Fair Housing.  It is disappointing to see the County’s leadership opposing affordable housing, while placing at risk federal funding for housing and other needed projects.

The New York Times: Westchester Loses Again on Fair Housing 

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Downtown Brooklyn Parking Text Amendment – Is it enough?

Jennifer Dickson, Urban Planner, Herrick's Land Use Group | August 14, 2012 in Parking,Real Estate Industry,Sustainability,Zoning | Comments (0)

 

This summer, City Planning is in the midst of a zoning change that will reduce the parking requirements for new buildings in Downtown Brooklyn.   The text amendment is part of the city’s larger reevaluation of the Zoning Resolution’s parking requirements, as I’ve discussed previously (DCP released a study last year examining Manhattan’s parking situation, but hasn’t yet introduced any text amendment for that area).  To recap the requirements – with the exception of Manhattan below 110th Street, all new buildings in NYC must provide some amount of on-site parking spaces.  This requirement can be as high as one space for 100% of all new residential units in lower density areas, and can be onerous for affordable housing and small buildings – or anywhere there isn’t a market for on-site parking spaces.  The zoning provides few exceptions to the parking requirements – the requirements for affordable housing are less than those for market rate residential buildings, and developments that are small enough can waive their requirement, but in most other cases, the only way that the parking requirement can be reduced is through a variance. 

Downtown Brooklyn’s text amendment, which reduces residential requirements from 40 to 20 percent, is currently winding its way through the public review process.  The reduction has been welcomed by many in the development community – the area continues to see a number of high-density residential development projects, and since it has some of the best transit access in the country, there simply isn’t a market for the required number of on-site parking spaces.  (more…)

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A Blueprint with Two Holes?

Eldad Gothelf, LEED AP Urban Planner, Herrick's Land Use Group | August 6, 2012 in Development,Planning,Zoning | Comments (0)

Earlier this year, the Department of City Planning unveiled the launch of their new Business Process Reform (i.e. BluePRint). Over the past 18 months, the Department worked with dozens of practitioners and stakeholders in the public review process to improve the way the private sector does business with City Planning. (Full Disclosure: several authors of this blog contributed to the effort.)

With the goal of improving the land use and environmental application review processes, the Department has standardized applications and the drawings, maps, attachments, and all other documentation associated with these applications. This is a huge step forward and will remove the second-guessing and seemingly endless revisions previously necessary to bring an application to the point of certification. Additionally, BluePRint aims to streamline the actual review of these documents to create a predictable and efficient pre-certification process. Again, bringing clarity to a previously unpredictable process will go a long way to improving the development process in New York City.

For a complete description of BluePRint, please see the Department’s explanation here.

In concept and in execution, we are optimistic about the all-around benefits anticipated from BluePRint. We believe in the Department’s sincerity at fixing what has been a long-standing problem. If the reforms are implemented and carried out as planned, all stakeholders – both in the public and private sector – will be better off.

That said, it appears that BluePRint has two major holes. (more…)

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City Planning Looks to the Future with East Midtown Zoning Proposal

Jennifer Dickson, Urban Planner, Herrick's Land Use Group | July 18, 2012 in Development,Planning,Rezonings,Zoning | Comments (0)

Last week, at a meeting of Community Board 5, City Planning finally released details of a much anticipated zoning proposal for East Midtown. The proposal, which could be the last major rezoning initiative of the Bloomberg administration, concentrates on the blocks around and north of Grand Central (the boundaries stretch roughly from Fifth Avenue to Second Avenue and from 39th to 57th Streets), which are already home to a number of high density office buildings.

The rezoning looks to incentivize property owners and developers to upgrade the area’s office building stock by permitting new development at a significantly higher density than is currently allowed.  The new regulations may also incorporate a “district improvement fund” type program, similar to what already exists in Hudson Yards.  As part of this program, developers could contribute to a fund, intended to finance the construction of a pedestrian plaza on what is now Vanderbilt Avenue, in exchange for even more floor area.   Under today’s zoning, a limited number of property owners are permitted to purchase excess development rights from Grand Central, and that program might also be expanded under the new proposal. (more…)

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Transparent Zoning

Mitch Korbey, Partner, Herrick's Land Use Group | July 17, 2012 in Trends,Zoning | Comments (1)

 

As a pedestrian, we want to see a lively street-scape at eye-level; we want buildings to have a “street life”, not a blank face.  A recent goal of new zoning for commercial strips is to mandate retail use and “building transparency” at the ground floor — see new zoning requirements for Park Slope.  (This follows long-standing rules prohibiting “pedestrian-unfriendly” uses – such as banks – along 5th Avenue in Midtown and Madison Avenue in the Upper East Side.)

Is it “proper” to use zoning on certain streets to achieve a design goal of avoiding a blank wall of dentist’s offices – or worse, interior parking – when such uses are otherwise allowed?  Is this an aesthetic issue – avoiding a solid wall along the street (where a building essentially “turns its back” to the pedestrian)?  Or, is it a question of enlivening the street with retail activity? (more…)

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Landmarks Commission does 30!

Mitch Korbey, Partner, Herrick's Land Use Group | July 11, 2012 in Landmarks | Comments (0)

Following the recent designation of the East Village Historic District and the major expansion to the existing Upper West Side Historic District, the current Landmarks Preservation Commission – or LPC – has approved a total of 30 historic districts and 8 historic district expansions – the most approved by any administration since the LPC’s was founded in 1965.

It is fair to note that a good chuck of Manhattan is now landmark-protected – including many of the Boroughs most desirable and “hot” neighborhoods (e.g., the meatpacking district).  From SoHo to the Upper East Side, from Harlem to the Ladies Mile and from Chelsea to Fulton Ferry, a diverse array of landmark districts governs ALL development and ANY façade alterations for thousands of Manhattan properties.   In quiet, deliberative fashion – often without much publicity or notice – the LPC has dramatically expanded its jurisdiction.  And, since we’ve never un-done (repealed) a historic district once adopted, this authority is likely with us forever.

(more…)

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